Atomic-o-licious

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There’s something I was told when I was a kid that I’ve always found true: life is complicated, and the closer you look at it the messier it gets. There are no easy answers. This is true of science just as it is of politics or relationships or really anything else.

A quote from a nice blog post by Puff the Mutant Dragon on what is worthy of concern and what is a waste of time when it comes to the food we eat.  Read it!

Chemical Reaction Caused Fatal Firework Explosion

laboratoryequipment:

Authorities in Lake Havasu City, Ariz., say a chemical reaction between fireworks and mixing compounds being transported in a car caused an explosion that fatally injured a California man.

Lake Havasu City Fire Marshal Chip Shilosky says the explosion occurred as 59-year-old Randy Feldman of Menlo Park and another man were driving on State Route 95 in Lake Havasu City on Feb. 12.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/03/chemical-reaction-caused-fatal-firework-explosion

I am intrigued.  What are these “mixing compounds” of which they speak? And why was a man driving around with them and fireworks in a  car?

othmeralia:

February is Black History Month.  Let’s take time to celebrate the work of Lewis Phectic Haslett an African American inventor who in 1849 received a patent for his Inhaler or Lung Protector, the predecessor to the modern gas mask.  Lewis P. Haslett’s simple device lead the way to the more technologically advanced masks used during the two World Wars to protect soldiers and their horses from poison gas attacks.  This field manual titled Defense Against Chemical Attack published in 1940 by the War Department shows soldiers the correct way to wear a mask and how to put a mask on your war horse.

Make sure you have secured your own mask before helping your horse with its mask.